Tour Guide – Corfulinas Travel http://corfulinastravel.com/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 09:01:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://corfulinastravel.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-5-150x150.png Tour Guide – Corfulinas Travel http://corfulinastravel.com/ 32 32 Jane Cleave Obituary (1921 – 2022) – Fresno, CA https://corfulinastravel.com/jane-cleave-obituary-1921-2022-fresno-ca/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 09:01:46 +0000 https://corfulinastravel.com/jane-cleave-obituary-1921-2022-fresno-ca/ Jane Cleave July 15, 1921 – January 3, 2022 Fresno, Calif. – Our mother would often tell her children and grandchildren what her own father used to tell her as a young girl: “Raise a girl and you raise a family.” Jane Euphemia McCollam Cleave died peacefully at her home on January 3, 2022 at […]]]>

Jane Cleave
July 15, 1921 – January 3, 2022
Fresno, Calif. – Our mother would often tell her children and grandchildren what her own father used to tell her as a young girl: “Raise a girl and you raise a family.”
Jane Euphemia McCollam Cleave died peacefully at her home on January 3, 2022 at the remarkable age of 100. She was born on July 15, 1921, to Millard E. McCollam and Euphemia Forbes McCollam in Sumner, WA where her father had founded the Washington State University Agriculture Experiment Station. When she was 10, her family moved back to California. As a young girl, she showed extraordinary talent in art and music. After graduating from high school in San Jose, she went on to study at the University of California, Berkeley, majoring in design (decorative art at the time), and serving as president of her sorority. In Cal, she met her future husband John H. Cleave III (Jack) as they both chaperoned their respective pledge classes in a social exchange. Their romance was cut short by World War II, and Jack served as an officer during the war while she continued her education and got a job in San Francisco. Upon Jack’s return, they were married in 1946 and set up their first home in Telegraph Hill in SF while he completed his studies at Cal. Jack’s first job took them to Tulsa Oklahoma where in 1948 their daughter Catherine was born. After finally returning to California in 1951, their son John H. Cleave IV was born in San Mateo in 1958.
The year 1958 also brought the family to Fresno where Jane lived for the next 63 years of her life. It would eventually become her beloved community and she believed in giving back to her community. His first love was the Fresno Art Center which later became the Fresno Art Museum. Early on, she knew she wanted to broaden young minds and their knowledge of art and its relationship to history. She developed a program for elementary students that has reached over 300 schools. She set up slideshows for the children and enthusiastically presented them herself and eventually recruited other volunteers. Her efforts led to her being named Educator of the Year by the Fresno County Alliance for the Arts, as well as being nominated for a Friend of Youth Award by the Boys and Girls Clubs of Fresno. It also led to her serving as chair of education on the art museum’s board of trustees. Jane’s excellence in scholarship led her to become the museum’s volunteer art historian and essayist. Over the years, she has written artist biographies and art overviews for numerous exhibition catalogs, several magazine articles, and numerous articles for museum newsletters. She liked to organize some exhibitions herself. She has served as a lecturer and tour guide for the museum and chair of the museum’s exhibits committee. Jane served on the museum’s board of trustees for a number of years in many capacities and was eventually honored as a trustee emeritus of the museum.
Jack was most supportive of her many endeavors and proud of her accomplishments. He gave generously to the museum in her honor. He planned trips centered on visiting various museums and art exhibits throughout the United States and Europe. She would thrive on these trips, and he always liked to make her happy.
When her eldest child left for college and during the early years of the art outreach program’s development, Jane returned to college to earn her master’s degree in art and art history at the University of Cal Fresno. In addition to her volunteer work in the arts community, Jane herself was an artist and always had a project at hand. Her most prolific endeavors were her silk screens which she would donate to various arts fundraisers. His drawings and sketches have also been praised. She has developed and donated logos, program designs and artwork for numerous arts organizations over the years. She often taught neighboring children and her children’s friends how to do screen printing. In 1971, she was inducted into the Fresno Chapter of the National Society of Arts and Letters where she enjoyed years of their programs and many friendships.
Jane also served on the board of the Fresno Philharmonic Orchestra and had fun playing the piano with her friends who formed the “Fearless Four” (2 pianos, 4 players, 8 hands). They would provide entertainment (with a touch of humour) for arts events and fundraisers and donate the proceeds to support the orchestra piano.
She never lost her love of the arts and sharing knowledge. She has always believed in the power of educating young people and giving back to her community. Her father’s words guided her through life. She passed it on to her own children and grandchildren. She was a force in all of our lives.
In addition to her parents, Jane was predeceased by her husband John H. Cleave III (Jack), her sister Dorothy M. Miller, and her son-in-law Randy Humphries. She is survived by her brother William F. McCollam (Sarah) of Monte Sereno, Calif.; daughter Catherine Humphries (Cathy) formerly of Mercer Island, WA and now Andover, MA; son John H. Cleave IV and wife Michelle of Fresno; 4 grandchildren: Rebecca Humphries, Daniel Humphries, Jane Humphries Cardoso (Rick) and Eleanore Humphries (Brian Wisniewski); and 4 great-grandsons: Eric and Will Cardoso and Kit and Cal Wisniewski,
The family express their sincere thanks to their son John Cleave for his constant care and love for his mother over the past few years. A small private service was held at St. Columba’s Episcopal Church in Fresno. The family requests that any donations to honor her life be sent in memory of Jane Cleave to the Fresno Art Museum, 2233 N. First St. Fresno, CA. 93703.

Published by Fresno Bee on January 23, 2022.

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To plant trees in memory, please visit the Sympathy store.
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Already bought tickets for Elton John’s farewell tour? Full guide on how to buy them https://corfulinastravel.com/already-bought-tickets-for-elton-johns-farewell-tour-full-guide-on-how-to-buy-them/ Thu, 20 Jan 2022 17:00:50 +0000 https://corfulinastravel.com/already-bought-tickets-for-elton-johns-farewell-tour-full-guide-on-how-to-buy-them/ Have you already collected your “Yellow Brick Road Farewell Tour” ticket? I’m sure if you’re here, reading this, you’re all excited to know how to get your hands on those tour tickets, to the right? In that case, allow me to be your helper and assist you while you take your time to book those […]]]>

Have you already collected your “Yellow Brick Road Farewell Tour” ticket?

I’m sure if you’re here, reading this, you’re all excited to know how to get your hands on those tour tickets, to the right?

In that case, allow me to be your helper and assist you while you take your time to book those tickets. Ready?

It’s been two years since we missed Elton John. Yes, he was on a break; probably because he was planning his return to the stage?

The British rocker is ready to deliver his best version.

With the final leg targeted in North America, the singer is ready to rock it yet again. The singer’s farewell tour began in 2018.

Tickets for the Elton John Tour 2022 – Book them now!

Elton, who we know for his fantastic work in “Tiny Dancer” and “Crocodile Rock” performed on Wednesday.

Additionally, he also confirmed his retirement and shared how he was done being a road performer. He started his tour in September 2018 and due to the ongoing pandemic he was forced to cut back his tour with a group of other musicians.

Back to booking tickets for Elton’s “Yellow Brick Road,” which is also his “farewell” tour, is available to book now.

Take tickets from:-

Elton’s official site marks TicketMaster as the official site to sell tickets. Elton has been planning this tour since 2020. Due to the pandemic, it has been postponed to 2022.

Across North America, the Elton John Farewell will take place. It will continue from January and will continue until April 2022.

Ticket prices and tour dates!

Tour dates!

Of course, you must know the dates of the visit before booking the ticket. Take a look at the 2022 tour dates.

  • January 21, 2022: Houston, Texas, United States
  • January 22, 2022: Houston, Texas, United States
  • January 25, 2022: Dallas, Texas, United States
  • January 25, 2022: Dallas, Texas, United States
  • January 29, 2022: North Little Rock, AR, USA
  • January 30, 2022: Oklahoma City, OK, USA
  • February 1, 2022: Kansas City, Missouri, USA
  • February 4, 2022: Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • February 5, 2022: Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • February 8, 2022: Detroit, MI, USA
  • February 9, 2022: Detroit, MI, USA
  • February 22, 2022: New York, New York, United States
  • February 23, 2022: New York, New York, United States
  • February 25, 2022: Newark, New Jersey, United States
  • March 1, 2022: Brooklyn, New York, USA
  • March 2, 2022: Brooklyn, New York, USA
  • March 5, 2022: Long Island, New York, USA
  • March 6, 2022: Long Island, New York, USA
  • March 19, 2022: Fargo, North Dakota, United States
  • March 22, 2022: St. Paul, MN, USA
  • March 23, 2022: St. Paul, MN, USA
  • March 26, 2022: Des Moines, Iowa, USA
  • March 27, 2022: Lincoln, NE, USA
  • March 30, 2022: St. Louis, Missouri, USA
  • April 1, 2022: Indianapolis, IN, USA

Click here and you can get the complete list of tours in the United States and Canada.

Tickets!

Depending on the seats and date you choose, the cost of tickets will fluctuate.

Therefore, choose your website wisely and calculate the cost of tickets. Go for the one that costs you the least amount of money.

The range of tickets on TicketMaster sees a variation from $146 to $1499+. The cost of VIP packages ranges from $175 to $1,499.

Depending on the dates you choose, you will find prices going up or down. The ticket price on Stubhub and SeatGeek varies slightly.

Have you already booked your tickets? Let us know!

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Jessie Veeder, will lead a reading of her new children’s book and a creative workshop at Gate 204, Watford City on January 21 https://corfulinastravel.com/jessie-veeder-will-lead-a-reading-of-her-new-childrens-book-and-a-creative-workshop-at-gate-204-watford-city-on-january-21/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 17:23:51 +0000 https://corfulinastravel.com/jessie-veeder-will-lead-a-reading-of-her-new-childrens-book-and-a-creative-workshop-at-gate-204-watford-city-on-january-21/ North Dakota writer and musician Jessie Veeder released her first children’s book, “Prairie Princess,” this month. To celebrate, she visits libraries across the state to lead a read, sign, discuss, and create activity for all ages. She will be at Gate 204, Watford City at 4.30pm on Friday January 21. “Prairie Princess” is a celebration […]]]>

North Dakota writer and musician Jessie Veeder released her first children’s book, “Prairie Princess,” this month. To celebrate, she visits libraries across the state to lead a read, sign, discuss, and create activity for all ages. She will be at Gate 204, Watford City at 4.30pm on Friday January 21.

“Prairie Princess” is a celebration of rural life and our connection to the land told through a young girl’s perspective. Beautifully illustrated by North Dakota artist Daphne JohnsonClark and inspired by Jessie’s magical childhood on her family’s ranch in western North Dakota, “Prairie Princess” lets a little girl be the guide expert tourist and guardian of the land she knows so well and reminds us of what it is like to be captivated and in charge of a place.

Veeder’s visit to the library will focus on reading the book and finding inspiration and what it takes to go from idea to print. She will share music and lead a fun and engaging creative writing and art project that will encourage participants of all ages to explore and commemorate the place they love the most. Attendees will leave inspired, connected and with a work of art they will be proud of.

Veeder will be available for a meet and book signing after the workshop. The book will be available for purchase at the event.

Veeder is a statewide columnist and has been a symbol of folk music in western North Dakota since releasing her debut album when she was just 16 years old. Since then, she has pursued a successful career in music and creative writing. Jessie’s 2015 album “Northern Lights” brought her to Nashville to record with Bill Warner, a producer who has worked with artists such as Garth Brooks, Dolly Parton and many more. Jessie’s skills as a songwriter and storyteller flourish in songs that remain rooted in the stories of her home in western North Dakota. His weekly writings can be found at http://www.veederranch.com.

For more information on Jessie Veeder’s work, visit http://www.jessieveedermusic.com.

For more information about the event, call 701-770-8659.

This project is supported in part by a grant from the North Dakota Council on the Arts, which receives funding from the state legislature and the National Endowment for the Arts.

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A Historic Effort for Futuristic Homes | News https://corfulinastravel.com/a-historic-effort-for-futuristic-homes-news/ Sun, 16 Jan 2022 23:08:00 +0000 https://corfulinastravel.com/a-historic-effort-for-futuristic-homes-news/ It is a puzzle on a colossal scale. Neatly stacked mounds of enameled steel are separated into piles: roofing panels here, doors and cabinets there, and rows of exterior wall pieces make up the largest piles in this Carthage warehouse. “There are all these pieces of metal. But they are more than metal,” Virginia Faust, […]]]>

It is a puzzle on a colossal scale. Neatly stacked mounds of enameled steel are separated into piles: roofing panels here, doors and cabinets there, and rows of exterior wall pieces make up the largest piles in this Carthage warehouse.

“There are all these pieces of metal. But they are more than metal,” Virginia Faust, NC Modernist chief archivist, told Lustron.






Stacks of cleaned Lustron panels and inventories in the Carthage warehouse. Abbi Overfelt / The Pilot


At a public event in early December, Faust acted as a tour guide through the maze of piles that are what remains of three Lustron houses that had been dismantled and stored for decades.

Considered the “home of the future” in the late 1940s, the Lustrons were designed to provide affordable housing for soldiers returning from World War II. The enameled steel structures cost less than $10,000 when new, had an open floor plan, built-in cabinetry and appliances, and were virtually maintenance-free. Built more like a model kit than traditional stick-built cases, they could be shipped anywhere in the United States and built on-site in about two weeks.






Lustron Components

Each Lustron house took over 3,300 pieces to build. Contributing photo.


However, less than 3,000 were created before the Lustron company filed for bankruptcy. Of these, less than 40 were sold in North Carolina.

As of 2020, there were at least four known Lustrons in Moore County. Two have since been demolished, including one in Pins du Sud and another in Carthage, in the past 18 months. The other two Lustron houses still standing are located in Pinehurst and Aberdeen.

Years ago, there was also a small encampment of eight Lustrons in Hoke County, located near Aberdeen Road and the old NC 211, which were used to house McCain Sanitarium workers.

When this community was about to be razed in the 1980s, local businessman DP Black acquired three of the houses. Black and his wife, Mary Lou, were killed at their Aberdeen home in July 2020. Two suspects arrested in connection are awaiting trial.

The Black family worked with NC Preservation, NC Modernist, and the Pines Preservation Guild to salvage the pieces from Lustron and move them to temporary storage in Carthage. O’Malley Investments donated the space where Faust and a small team of volunteers sorted, cleaned and inventoried the collection.

“Obtaining the DP Black structures has been a wonderful development for all three of our organizations, and we can hopefully offer an interested Moore County resident the opportunity to obtain one of these rare structures,” said said Leslie Brians, director of the Pines Preservation Guild. director.






Leslie Brian

Leslie Brians, co-founder and executive director of the Pines Preservation Guild. Abbi Overfelt / The Pilot


Some of the major structural elements, such as the roof trusses, of the three houses had deteriorated during storage. Also missing from the collection are a few iconic Lustron pieces, such as bathtubs.

Nonetheless, the thousands of individual pieces that remain are in high demand for other Lustron restoration or maintenance projects, and can also be repurposed for smaller concept projects, such as a Lustron-inspired barn or outbuilding.

Faust, a statewide expert on the Lustrons, oversees the initial push to clean up or inventory the materials. Once this work is completed, the Guild will become the owner of the collection. Sales of Lustron panels and other components will create a continued revenue stream for the organization in the future.






Lustron House

A remodeled Lustron house, photo courtesy of NC Modernist.


“What was really cool with the December event was that we were able to recruit a volunteer to help Virginia. We also had great interest from the community. We want to build our base of people interested in historic preservation to create networking opportunities,” Brians said.

Brians has a professional background in historic preservation and architecture. However, as a military wife, she had struggled to put down roots until her active-duty husband was posted to Fort Bragg.

“We have lived all over the world. Some places, like New Orleans, have a strong focus on preservation. Other places, like where I grew up in Virginia, have rampant overdevelopment.

The couple moved to More County in 2015, purchasing a historic home. She said she was surprised by the absence of a local historic preservation advocacy group.

“We got together with a few other like-minded people and decided we wanted to fill that void. We believe there is a real need for advocacy for these heritage buildings and also the communities these structures represent,” Brians said. “The Guild is about advocating and educating people about what makes this region special.”

Brians and Emily Yopp, who restored the circa 1880 Waddell-Larking House in Carthage, co-founded the Pines Preservation Guild. Other board members are Corey Moore, Cara Mathis and Kristen Moracco.

“Our organization is not just made up of people involved in historic preservation. These are real estate agents, urban planners and people who are simply interested in historic buildings. It’s a big cornucopia of people. We try to give voice and empower people who feel the same about historic preservation. That’s what we advocate. »

Brians added that they are not opposed to the development. “It just needs to be done in a holistic and sustainable way that integrates existing properties with future development.”

Upcoming events include a series of trades training activities aimed at traditional artisans and laypersons interested in the upkeep of historic homes. The Guild is also coordinating with the Weymouth Center for the Arts and Humanities the celebration of Boyd House’s 100th anniversary with an event called Bikes, Boyds and Brews on August 21. Activities include a bike tour of historic homes in the Southern Pines associated with the Boyd family.

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Ancient and not-so-ancient history meet in the flourishing forest of Neve Ilan https://corfulinastravel.com/ancient-and-not-so-ancient-history-meet-in-the-flourishing-forest-of-neve-ilan/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 07:20:04 +0000 https://corfulinastravel.com/ancient-and-not-so-ancient-history-meet-in-the-flourishing-forest-of-neve-ilan/ Eliezer Schwartz was born in Germany in 1928 and moved with his family to France as a child. After the occupation of France by Germany, he joined the Maquis, groups of young men who fled into the woods and mountains to avoid being conscripted into forced labor for Germany. Soon they became active members of […]]]>

Eliezer Schwartz was born in Germany in 1928 and moved with his family to France as a child. After the occupation of France by Germany, he joined the Maquis, groups of young men who fled into the woods and mountains to avoid being conscripted into forced labor for Germany. Soon they became active members of the French Resistance, carrying out missions against the Nazis.

Schwartz survived the war, and in 1945, at the age of 17, headed for what was then British Mandate Palestine. A year later, he became one of the founding members of a pioneer outpost called Kibbutz Neve Ilan in the hills above the narrow road to Jerusalem. The land for the outpost had been purchased by the Jewish National Fund from an Arab effendi after David Ben-Gurion – later to become Israel’s first prime minister – deemed it prudent to establish a military presence above of this very important narrow road.

The stony ground made farming difficult and there was no electricity; the water was brought in once a week by truck and poured into a cistern. And in late November 1947, after the United Nations approved a plan for Palestine that called for its division into an Arab state and a Jewish state, relations that had been friendly with neighboring Arabs soured. They immediately cut off the road to Jerusalem and supplies could only reach the Holy City by fortified convoys.

On January 15, 1948, Schwartz and some friends were walking near the outpost when they were ambushed. Nineteen-year-old Schwartz was shot and killed – Neve Ilan’s first death.

During the 1948 War of Independence, Neve Ilan came under heavy fire from Arab armies and the outpost was badly damaged. But after the war ended, Neve Ilan began rapid economic development by introducing poultry and dairy farms and raising mushrooms.

Unfortunately, as the kibbutz grew and prospered economically, the relationship between the members did not change. In the early 1950s, members left the kibbutz, and it was finally abandoned in 1956.

Ancient structures of the original kibbutz in this photo taken along the historic Neve Ilan Forest Walk. (Shmuel Bar-Am)

Today’s Neve Ilan was founded as moshav, or cooperative farming community, by a group of North Americans belonging to the Zionist youth movement Young Judea. In the early 1970s, the members moved to new buildings which were constructed next to the old outpost. Today, in addition to farming, Neve Ilan makes a living from an extremely popular modern hotel.

Remnants of the original outpost still stand, although a planned heritage site never materialized. But visitors can see the old structures and take a lovely little circular nature hike that offers spectacular mountain views and the endearing sight of blood-red tulips, brilliant anemones, and bicolor bugloss.

Flowers bloom along the historic Neve Ilan Forest Walk. (Shmuel Bar-Am)

In the forest of Neve Ilan, located next to the newer houses of the moshav, are a variety of wonderful sites. All were prepared for visitors by Keren Kayemeth LeIsrael – Jewish National Fund (KKL-JNF).

Belgium Park, with picnic areas and rock memorials, is dedicated to the 29,000 Belgian Jews murdered during the Holocaust. A short and beautiful climb through the park leads to the magnificent Simone Louki Overlook. Dotted with pretty covered benches, it offers marvelous views of the surrounding area.

The Simone Louki Overlook in the Belgian Park. (Shmuel Bar-Am)

Unique sights await those who take the winding road to the right of the park entrance. A few hundred meters along the road, on the left with a small sign in Hebrew, a steep slope leads to the Forest of Educational Seminars and Colleges.

On a trip there in late November, the winter flowers were just beginning to bloom. Among them were blushing pink crocuses, delicate flowers growing just off the ground. The poisonous bulb of the crocus is, paradoxically, sometimes used in the treatment of cancer.

A forest cyclamen in the forest of Neve Ilan. (Shmuel Bar-Am)

Here and there cyclamen were also sticking out of the ground, and there should be plenty of them all winter. Stunning in shades that range from creamy white to dazzling pink, cyclamen are called tzabon el ra’i in Arabic, or “shepherds’ soap”. Indeed, in the past, local Arabs often used halved cyclamen bulbs as an alternative to soap. The underside of the heart-shaped leaves of the cyclamen is often purple, a color that warms the leaf and protects it during the chilly days and nights of winter.

The daffodils, with white petals and golden crowns, were just beginning to bloom when we visited in late fall and will continue to bloom for several months. The botanical name of the daffodil is Narcissus. Some believe the flower’s name is derived from a Greek myth in which a vain young hunter named Narcissus drowned while trying to kiss his reflection in a clear, sparkling pool. It could, however, come from the Greek narkao, which means to numb, as the plant has narcotic properties. Indeed, if you apply an extract from the bulbs to an open wound, it can lead to paralysis of the heart and nervous system!

Narcissus, more commonly known as daffodils, near the Benny Kaplan Overlook in Neve Ilan Forest. (Shmuel Bar-Am)

A short path leads to a lookout named for Benny Kaplan, whose actions as president of the Lachish region in the Negev desert were vital for settlement in the south. The view is stunning from here – and the ground near the path is strewn with flowers. In addition to the picnic tables and gazebo, this beautiful site sports five unusual sculptures called “Ibex”, “Spirit”, “Window to the View”, “Image in the Forest”, and “Chairs”. Not all of them have a title, so have fun guessing which is which!

Near the “Ibex” sculpture, a somewhat rocky path climbs through the Dutch forest – woods renovated with the help of the Dutch friends of the JNF after the area suffered a devastating forest fire. At the top of the hill, located 530 meters above sea level, are extensive ruins of an ancient fortress. Built over 2,000 years ago during the reign of Hasmonean King Alexander Jannaeus, the fortress overlooks the road through the Ayalon Valley to Jerusalem.

Sculptures near the Benny Kaplan Overlook in the Neve Ilan Forest. (Shmuel Bar-Am)

Explore the fortress, to which King Herod I added a courtyard and some rooms at the end of the first century BC. In the year 70, during the Jewish revolt against the Romans, the site was abandoned; a coin belonging to a soldier of the Roman legion, proof that the Roman army swept through this part of the country, was found nearby.

Hundreds of years later, when the Islamic caliphates controlled the country, the fortress was transformed into a caravanserai or roadside inn. As well as remains dating from the Iron Age – 1200 BCE, around the time the Bible describes the Exodus from Egypt – archaeologists digging at the site discovered 22 tombs whose occupants were buried on the side, facing Mecca.

A view of the ruins of the Hasmonean fortress atop the hill in Holland Forest. (Shmuel Bar-Am)

Here on the hill, the fields are dotted with a variety of wildflowers, from cistus, poppies and white mustard to – in March – the stunning purple and white prickly pear. Best of all, visitors have sweeping views of Ben Shemen Forest, Modi’in, the surrounding lowland hills, and sometimes, when the sky is clear, even Tel Aviv.

View from the ruins of an ancient Hasmonean fortress in the forest of Neve Ilan. (Shmuel Bar-Am)

Aviva Bar-Am is the author of seven English guides to Israel.
Shmuel Bar-Am is a licensed tour guide who offers private and personalized tours in Israel for individuals, families and small groups.

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Far-right Israeli settler appointed tour guide for US military officers – Middle East Monitor https://corfulinastravel.com/far-right-israeli-settler-appointed-tour-guide-for-us-military-officers-middle-east-monitor/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 13:58:00 +0000 https://corfulinastravel.com/far-right-israeli-settler-appointed-tour-guide-for-us-military-officers-middle-east-monitor/ U.S. Army officers were invited to visit the Palestinian city of Hebron (Al-Khalil) last week by a far-right settler spokesperson at the request of Major General Yehuda Fuchs, chief of the command central office of the Israel Defense Forces. This despite the fact that settlers in Hebron and the surrounding area have a reputation for […]]]>

U.S. Army officers were invited to visit the Palestinian city of Hebron (Al-Khalil) last week by a far-right settler spokesperson at the request of Major General Yehuda Fuchs, chief of the command central office of the Israel Defense Forces. This despite the fact that settlers in Hebron and the surrounding area have a reputation for being among the most fanatical of all.

Fuchs contacted far-right spokesman Noam Arnon to ask him to lead the full-day tour, which included a visit to the Ibrahimi Mosque, which the settlers call the Cave of the Patriarchs. US officers were also shown in areas of the occupied Palestinian city where illegal Israeli settlements are located.

Although Palestinians constitute the vast majority of Hebron’s population, the occupation army has made no effort to invite anyone to represent the community living under what many commentators and rights groups have said. man have described it as racial segregation imposed by the occupation state.

Some 850 heavily armed Israeli settlers live in the city. They are protected by soldiers among more than 200,000 Palestinians. Hebron has often been a flashpoint. In February 1994, an American Jewish settler, Baruch Goldstein, opened fire on worshipers while they were praying in the Ibrahimi Mosque, killing 29 Palestinians and injuring many more. He continued to shoot until he was overpowered by the survivors and beaten to death.

Goldstein’s act of terrorism earned him cult hero status among Israeli settlers. His grave in the settlement of Kiryat Arba in the occupied West Bank outside Hebron has over the years become a place of pilgrimage for extremist Jews. A shrine in his memory has also been erected there.

READ: PA condemns Israeli president’s ‘storming’ of Ibrahimi mosque

Israel’s coordination with a far-right settler reflects what many see as a disturbing change fueled in November by Israeli President Isaac Herzog’s visit to the Ibrahimi Mosque. In recent years, the military has stopped its own tours and field visits in conjunction with settlers in the occupied city.

Palestinian Prime Minister Mohammad Shtayyeh criticized Herzog’s visit and accused him of attempting “to distort the truth about the Arab and Islamic city, to Judaize and control it while subjecting its indigenous population to a racist regime “.

The Arab League, the Organization for Islamic Cooperation (OIC) and several Arab and Muslim countries, including Jordan and Saudi Arabia, called the president’s visit provocative. The OIC said Herzog’s visit was part of “Israeli plans to Judaize the Ibrahimi Mosque and tighten Israel’s grip on it.”

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Cameron Smith on fire, Maverick McNealy on the verge of a breakout & more – The Athletic https://corfulinastravel.com/cameron-smith-on-fire-maverick-mcnealy-on-the-verge-of-a-breakout-more-the-athletic/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 13:36:45 +0000 https://corfulinastravel.com/cameron-smith-on-fire-maverick-mcnealy-on-the-verge-of-a-breakout-more-the-athletic/ The PGA Tour is doing a few islanders this week as it travels from Maui to Oahu for the Sony Open. Players had to be turned down for qualifying on Monday as there was a long waiting list to take one of the coveted spots available to play at Wai’alae Country Club. Even with so […]]]>

The PGA Tour is doing a few islanders this week as it travels from Maui to Oahu for the Sony Open. Players had to be turned down for qualifying on Monday as there was a long waiting list to take one of the coveted spots available to play at Wai’alae Country Club. Even with so much interest, there was still a decent amount of WD at the time of writing. The biggest name who stepped down on Monday was Bryson DeChambeau, who is said to have played Wai’alae for the first time since becoming the best golf ball driver on tour.

With Bryson retiring, all eyes will be on Cameron Smith as he looks to make two in a row in Hawaii. Smith put on quite the show in Kapalua fending off world number 1 Jon Rahm for the end-to-end victory. With Rahm and Smith running away from the field, it gave me a nice relaxing weekend enjoying some good golf instead of breaking my bets. Matt Jones has had the weekend of his life and it will only be a footnote to the duel between Rahm and Smith.

The Sony Open will be the first full event that features a 2022 cup and of course that means we need to hone our focus when looking to fill our lines or look for value in betting. Wai’alae CC will give up birdies and eagles as the Par 70 layout is just over 7,000 meters. Players should take advantage of par 5s and not leave the tee on par 4. Players who putt well tend to play well here. Kevin Na and Cameron Smith who have won the past two years are only scratching the surface of the type of players I will be looking at this week.

Bet slip

Sungjae Im 16-1 to win was in my sights at the Tournament of Champions but had to shop to get it at 25-1 to finally add it to my ticket. He played well but obviously finished well behind the leaders in 8th position.

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This 9,000-year-old Turkish city may be older than the pyramids https://corfulinastravel.com/this-9000-year-old-turkish-city-may-be-older-than-the-pyramids/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 20:30:00 +0000 https://corfulinastravel.com/this-9000-year-old-turkish-city-may-be-older-than-the-pyramids/ This city in Turkey is estimated to be older than the Pyramids, which places it in the running for one of the oldest sites in the world. Some of the most important archaeological sites are often lost in general knowledge. Çatalhöyük may not be well known, but it is one of the most important sites […]]]>

This city in Turkey is estimated to be older than the Pyramids, which places it in the running for one of the oldest sites in the world.

Some of the most important archaeological sites are often lost in general knowledge. Çatalhöyük may not be well known, but it is one of the most important sites in the truly ancient world. Turkey has some of the most important and oldest archaeological sites in the world, including Göbekli Tepe which makes the Great Pyramids look young.

Çatalhöyük was a very large Neolithic and Chalcolithic proto-city in what is now Turkey. It was inhabited from around 7,500 BC to around 6,400 BC and flourished around 7,000 BC.

About Çatalhöyük and his age

Çatalhöyük is located close to the modern city of Konya (Konya is perhaps also the best place to see the iconic Whirling Dervishes in Turkey). The site can be easily reached by car from Konya.


  • Registered: As a UNESCO World Heritage Site

These prehistoric settlements were abandoned before the start of the Bronze Age. It is probable that the alluvial clay on which they were built would have been favorable to an early agriculture allowing them to flourish.

Age of notable sites:

  • Göbekli Tepe: 9,500 to 8,000 BC
  • Çatalhöyük: 7,500 BC to 6,400 BC
  • Stonehenge: 3000 BC to 2000 BC
  • Pyramids of Giza: 2,550 to 2,490 BC.

One of the most remarkable things about Çatalhöyük is that it appears to have only been made up of domestic buildings. There are no obvious public buildings (although some of the larger buildings have ornate murals and the purpose of the rooms is still not known).


While the settlement population would have varied considerably over time, it is estimated that it could have grown to 10,000 and averaged between 5,000 and 7,000.

  • Population: Probably an average of 5,000 to 7,000
  • Layers: There are about 15 successive layers of buildings

Çatalhöyük was once a densely populated and prosperous community. But all that is visible today on the surface are two mounds. The smaller one to the west of the site is newer while the larger one is older.

The civilization that once lived here was one of the most complicated societies of its time and work continues to piece together what life was meant to look like.


According to Dr Senta German on Smart History,

Çatalhöyük had no streets or footpaths; the houses were built against each other and the people who lived there traveled on the roofs of the city and entered their houses through holes in the roofs, descending a ladder. “

Çatalhöyük goes through the history of the transition from a lifestyle exclusively of hunting and gathering to a lifestyle increasingly based on agriculture with the domestication of plants and animals. It is a site that tells a fascinating story of the transition from nomad to settler.

Related: The Prehistoric Village of Skara Brae is Home to Another of Britain’s Neolithic Stonehenge Sites


Çatalhöyük excavations

The excavations revealed some 18 successive strata of buildings which bear witness to the different eras of the site’s history. The lower layer (and the oldest layer of buildings is dated to 7100 BC).

The site was first excavated in 1958 by James Mellaart and subsequent work revealed how important and a center of advanced culture this part of Turkey was during the Neolithic era.

  • First excavation: In 1958
  • In progress: Excavations are ongoing as at time of writing

As of this writing, excavations are underway led by Ali Umut Türkcan of Anadolu University. Another project under the leadership of Ian Hodder ended a few years ago in 2018, but since an update on their website dated November 2021, the results are still in the works.


So watch this space, there will likely be many more appearing in the next few years.

A 50 minute educational video of the site can be viewed on the Çatalhöyük website. The video tells the past and present stories of Çatalhöyük and is produced by Rossella Biscotti who has spent several months on the site documenting the projects taking place there.

Related: Göbekli Tepe Vs. Stonehenge: Which One Is Actually The Oldest?

Visit Çatalhöyük

According to the Çatalhöyük website, the team working on the Çatalhöyük research project is always happy to receive visitors. Although the site is open year round, it is best to visit it during excavation season, as that is when the site is most active.


  • Open: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. every day

At the site, there is a small on-site visitor center that features exhibits and replicas of artifacts designed by the project’s visualization team.

Visitors are guided by a dedicated tour guide or site keeper who will also take one to the north and south excavation areas and the replica of Çatalhöyük’s house.

  • Forbidden: It is strictly forbidden to access the site without a guide
  • Installations: Public toilets and a cafe

Next: Karahan Tepe is called the ‘sister site’ of Gobekli Tepe in Turkey (and is just as old)

a woman boating in banff national park

More than hiking: a guide to Canada’s oldest national park


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Kelly Ann (Sharp) Smalts | Frederick Head of Press https://corfulinastravel.com/kelly-ann-sharp-smalts-frederick-head-of-press/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://corfulinastravel.com/kelly-ann-sharp-smalts-frederick-head-of-press/ Funeral services for Kelly Ann (Sharp) Smalts were scheduled for 2 p.m. on Wednesday, Jan.5, 2022, at Sunset Memorial Gardens, Lawton. Arrangements are under the direction of Lawton Ritter Gray Funeral Home. The viewing was scheduled for Monday, January 3 from 1 p.m. to 8 p.m. and Tuesday, January 4 from 9 a.m. to 8 […]]]>

Funeral services for Kelly Ann (Sharp) Smalts were scheduled for 2 p.m. on Wednesday, Jan.5, 2022, at Sunset Memorial Gardens, Lawton.

Arrangements are under the direction of Lawton Ritter Gray Funeral Home.

The viewing was scheduled for Monday, January 3 from 1 p.m. to 8 p.m. and Tuesday, January 4 from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. at the funeral home.

Kelly was born on May 4, 1967 in Canyon, Texas to Jerry Sharp and Carolyn (May) Sharp. Sadly, she left this land after a fierce battle on December 29, 2021. She graduated from Frederick High School in 1985, where she excelled both academically and musically. She was Frederick Junior Sweetheart in 1982, sponsored by Xi Alpha Chi, Beta Sigma Phi and Miss Frederick 1983. Her talent as a beautiful singer led her to perform in plays such as “South Pacific”. She pursued her desire to become a professional Christian interpreter at West Texas State University. Her career as an artist has taken her to Nashville Musical Productions and various cruise ships. She later worked as a flight attendant for Southwest Airlines and as a tour guide for Village Travel and Tours. A career change led her to work as CNA, CMA for hospitals and retirement centers. She still found time to sing for her boarders.

Kelly married Perry Smalts in March 2000. Her son, Andrew, was born of this union and was her pride and joy.

Kelly’s memory is cherished by those who knew her. Family, friends, and her Savior, Jesus, were her world. All who loved her are at peace knowing that she is safe at home.

Kelly is survived by her parents; his son, Andrew Smalts, Lawton; her brother, Roger Sharp (Mary Jo), Newberg, OR; niece, Emily Sharp-Rucky (Josh), Austin, Texas; grandmother, Evelyn May, Lawton; half-brother, David Anders, Oklahoma City; half-sisters Wendy Scott, Tammy Koste Lecky and Carrie West, Oklahoma City; and Perry Smalts, Mustang.

Kelly was predeceased by her grandparents, Darl and Helen Sharp; grandfather, Alvis May; aunt, Suzanne May; stepfather, Henry Anders; stepmother, Kay Sharp; half-brother, Brian Elliot; and baby, Corra Jayne Hailer.

There are so many family members who watched Kelly grow up and make her dreams come true. These names are too many to list but are loved to be in his life. Our thanks to the staff at CURA Rehab Oklahoma City who took care of Kelly. You were a blessing.

In lieu of flowers, please consider donating to your church or your favorite school’s music program.

Masks are suggested during the ceremony.


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dreams come true | News, Sports, Jobs https://corfulinastravel.com/dreams-come-true-news-sports-jobs/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 06:43:33 +0000 https://corfulinastravel.com/dreams-come-true-news-sports-jobs/ Philadelphia head coach and Jamestown native Nick Sirianni led the Eagles to a decisive playoff victory over Washington football on Sunday. AP photo Former Jamestown High School star Jaysean Paige, below, made his NBA debut with the Detroit Pistons on Saturday. Photo courtesy of Ken Ricker Philadelphia head coach and Jamestown native Nick Sirianni led […]]]>

Philadelphia head coach and Jamestown native Nick Sirianni led the Eagles to a decisive playoff victory over Washington football on Sunday. AP photo

Sunday night’s NFL game between Minnesota and Green Bay was so one-sided that I turned the volume down right after halftime and turned off the TV completely shortly after. At this point, I was pretty sure the Vikings had no chance of beating the Packers, and as a result, a playoff berth in Philadelphia was almost guaranteed.

I’ll say it again: The Eagles, who finished 4-12 last year, go to the playoffs, and they do it largely because their first-year head coach, who is from Jamestown, got them there- low.

Yes, Nick Sirianni, the guy who grew up in West Ellicott, has guided Philly to seven wins in their last nine games. To put that in perspective, he’s now only the fourth rookie head coach in NFL history to start season 2-5 and have a winning record.

Others?

Frank Reich.

Former Jamestown High School star Jaysean Paige, below, made his NBA debut with the Detroit Pistons on Saturday. Photo courtesy of Ken Ricker

Mike Holmgren.

Mike Mularkey.

Pretty good company for Sirianni, and certainly a claim that Eagles owner Jeffrey Lurie made the right choice when he made the hire a year ago this month. Fans in Philly got very upset when the announcement was made, as at the time Sirianni didn’t have the name recognition but what he did have was a huge endorsement from Reich, who worked with Sirianni when they were on the San Diego / Los Angeles Chargers coaching staff. Reich was also the Eagles’ offensive coordinator when they won Super Bowl 52 in February 2018, so his recommendation carried a lot of weight with Lurie.

Fast forward from last winter to early last summer. In June, I received an email from Zach Berman, the Eagles’ beat writer for the subscription sports website The Athletic, who was planning a trip to Jamestown to make a story on Sirianni. Among other things, the sports reporter wondered how growing up in the community shaped the Southwestern Central School graduate in 1999, and he was also curious if there were any places in town. “To see and share” with Eagles fans.

About a week later I was more than happy to serve Berman’s “Touristic guide.” During our travels in the Southwest, at Johnny’s Lunch on Fairmount Avenue in West Ellicott (a frequent destination for Sirianni during his high school years) and at the Chautauqua Sports Hall of Fame on West Third Street in Jamestown, Berman told me asked why I thought Sirianni was the right guy for the Eagles job.

My answer, if I remember correctly, was short and to the point, something like: “Because he’s been successful wherever he’s coached. “

From Mount Union University and Indiana University of Pennsylvania through the varsity ranks in Kansas City, San Diego and Indianapolis to the NFL, Sirianni has always displayed a keen football sense and enthusiasm. which aroused praise from those around him.

Eagles quarterback Jalen Hurts is apparently also a member of that Sirianni-loving fraternity, declaring at his post-game press conference following Sunday’s 20-16 win over the Washington soccer team that consistency of his head coach in preaching the importance of core values ​​a “Has been our goal and our true identity. “

“This is what we are” Hurts said. “With all the young people and all the inexperience, from the coaches to the players, we come to accepting who we are and who we could be, and to trust the grind and approach each day as we do.”

Sirianni admitted that when Eagles defensive back Rodney McLeod intercepted a pass in the end zone in the dying seconds to secure the victory over the Washington football team, he had to “To fight back tears of joy”.

“It’s such an emotional game. That’s why we all love this game so much ”, he said in his post-match press conference. “There are so many ups and downs. It’s so realistic. The excitement and joy when something like this happens…. it’s pretty special to be a part of it.

It wasn’t the only special moment for a Jamestown resident this weekend.

Former Jamestown High School star Jaysean Paige played his first NBA game on Saturday night. Signed for a 10-day contract by Detroit on Friday, Paige played seven minutes in the Pistons’ 117-116 victory over San Antonio. Although he didn’t score – he was 0 of 3 on the pitch – he had an assist and a rebound.

The fact that he’s even on the pitch is a testament not only to his basketball skills, but also to his determination. Despite being only 27 years old, the 2010-11 former Post-Journalist Player of the Year has literally continued his love for hoops across the globe for the past decade. After moving to Hazard, Ky. And playing for Perry County High School in her senior year, Paige landed at the College of Southern Idaho for a year, averaging 13.6 points; transferred to Moberly (Missouri) Area Community College in second year where he obtained an average of 21 points; then moved on to the University of West Virginia.

Under coach Bob Huggins, Paige went from an average of 5.6 points per game as a junior to 14.3 points per game as a senior when he received the sixth man from the year of the Big 12 Conference. Highlights this season include Paige scoring a career-high 34 points against Iowa State and having 26 points, five steals and four rebounds when the Mountaineers upset Kansas, the best.

Prior to this season, Paige played professionally for teams in Germany, North Macedonia, England, Hungary and Puerto Rico and was on his second stint with Maine in the NBA G League when he was signed by the Pistons.

“It’s an inexplicable feeling” he texted me on Saturday morning.

And while it’s unclear whether the 6-foot-2 point guard will have an extended stay in Detroit after his 10-day contract expires, what is certain is that he never gave up his dream.

Sirianni neither.

Look where they are now?

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