Tour Guide – Corfulinas Travel http://corfulinastravel.com/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 18:15:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://corfulinastravel.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-5-150x150.png Tour Guide – Corfulinas Travel http://corfulinastravel.com/ 32 32 A few shouts, a few shrugs on Booking.com “Warning” of Israeli settlements https://corfulinastravel.com/a-few-shouts-a-few-shrugs-on-booking-com-warning-of-israeli-settlements/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 18:15:36 +0000 https://corfulinastravel.com/a-few-shouts-a-few-shrugs-on-booking-com-warning-of-israeli-settlements/ Veterans of Israeli tourism industry tell The Media Line impact of ruling will be minimal, tourism minister swears ‘diplomatic war’ and Palestinian hotelier says he wants the world to follow his lead International tourist accommodation giant Booking.com plans to introduce a disclaimer on accommodations located in Israeli settlements in the West Bank, saying it is […]]]>

Veterans of Israeli tourism industry tell The Media Line impact of ruling will be minimal, tourism minister swears ‘diplomatic war’ and Palestinian hotelier says he wants the world to follow his lead

International tourist accommodation giant Booking.com plans to introduce a disclaimer on accommodations located in Israeli settlements in the West Bank, saying it is company policy to add such a disclaimer to all areas considered a “conflict zone”.

The decision announced this week sparked outrage among Israeli politicians, while industry experts in the country were less pessimistic about its impact.

The Booking.com website allows travelers to book their own accommodation independently, choosing from more than 28 million listings in 228 countries and territories around the world.

Local media reported that starting Thursday, the website will display a warning on all accommodation in West Bank settlements, stating that “visiting the area may come with an increased risk to security and human rights or other risks to the local community and visitors”.

“Some conflict-affected areas may present a greater risk to travelers, so we provide our customers with information to help them make decisions and encourage them to check their government’s official travel guidelines as part of the process. decision-making,” the company told Israel. the Ynet media, explaining the reasons for this decision.

The company said the warning would also appear for “other conflict zones” around the world. According to reports, the website also plans to add the alert to accommodations in East Jerusalem, which was annexed by Israel after it captured Jordan in the 1967 Six-Day War, a move not recognized by the International community.

Tourism Minister Yoel Razvozov told the Ynet news site that he was determined to fight the decision. He said the Israeli government would wage a “diplomatic war” to reverse what he called a “political” decision.

I think Booking.com is wrong to jump on the political bandwagon. They should focus on promoting business, not boycotting business for any political agenda.

Booking.com claims to facilitate more than 1,550,000 overnight stays each day. According to respected analytics website SimilarWeb, the travel website has averaged 675 million monthly visits over the past three months.

There are some 140 Israeli settlements in the West Bank, including dozens of tourist sites. Some human rights groups have lobbied for years for websites such as Booking.com to remove their listings.

Airbnb, which allows people to rent their own homes to guests, introduced a ban on settlement listings in 2018 but reversed it about six months later after Israeli lawyers filed a class action lawsuit.

Israeli tourist guide David Ha’ivri, who lives in the West Bank, doubts the move will significantly harm settlement resorts.

“I’m skeptical of how many such businesses in Judea and Samaria actually rely on Booking.com for their business,” Ha’ivri told The Media Line, referring to the West Bank by its biblical name.

“It’s really a political thing what they’re doing,” he said, pointing out that the controversy surrounding the decision has also put the spotlight on the resorts themselves.

“Just by doing so…they highlight the fact that there is a tourism and tourist services industry in Judea and Samaria,” Ha’ivri said.

“That being said, I think Booking.com is wrong to jump on the political bandwagon. They should be focused on promoting business and not boycotting business for any political agenda,” he said.

Elias Al Arja, a Palestinian hotelier from Bethlehem, told The Media Line that he supports Booking.com’s decision.

“Hotels in Palestine are good and safe under our government. In areas where the Israelis have built hotels and are trying to market them as Judea and Samaria, it’s something else,” he said.

“It’s not Palestinian, it’s not as safe as Palestinian areas,” Al Arja added.

Booking.com has the “right” to label settlement hotels, he said.

“I’m looking for the world to do something like this, not just Booking,” the hotelier told The Media Line.

“Israelis get grants to build in the region like Moscow did in the Donbass, helping people build a project and sell it as Russian and that’s what the Israelis are doing here,” he said. he says, comparing Israel to Russia and the Palestinians to Ukraine. . “They are destroying our [industry] and build alternatives in the areas they occupied.

Hotels in Palestine are good and safe under our government. In areas where the Israelis have built hotels and are trying to market them as Judea and Samaria, it’s something else.

Veteran Israeli tourism industry expert Ron Sinai is also unfazed. The move has nothing to do with anti-Israel sentiment, it’s purely Booking.com making its policies consistent, he told The Media Line.

“It’s not made by anti-Israel or pro-Palestine [sentiment]but a desire to present the information to their customers,” he said.

“Their approach is that someone who is unfamiliar with the issue and is looking for a hotel in the area will receive this warning before making their reservation,” Sinai said.

There are very few resorts that will be affected by the ruling, and those that are are not actually dependent on Booking.com for their business, he said.

“Almost the only places that could be affected by this are two kibbutzim, Almog and Kalia, which are across the Green Line border” between Israel and the West Bank, Sinai said.

According to Sinai, these two places north of the Dead Sea are not associated with the West Bank – unlike places like Maale Adumim, Modiin Illit or Kiryat Arba, whose visitors know where they are and don’t care.

He reiterated his belief that the travel site’s pitch is not motivated by any anti-Israel sentiment and posited that the anger expressed by Israeli politicians has more to do with the upcoming Knesset elections.

“It’s not just us, [Booking.com] are doing this around the world,” he told The Media Line.

“I’m not a victim here,” he said. “You decided it was dangerous?” Alright, it’s your prerogative, you’re the one selling it.

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Edward Huber’s Marion Legacy https://corfulinastravel.com/edward-hubers-marion-legacy/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 09:35:21 +0000 https://corfulinastravel.com/edward-hubers-marion-legacy/ Every week, this series shares MarionMade! stories of our many wonderful people, places, products and programs in the greater Marion community. To read more positive stories from Marion, or to share some of your own, visit us at marionmade.org or on social media. The Huber Machinery Museum at Marion County Fairgrounds takes visitors on a […]]]>

Every week, this series shares MarionMade! stories of our many wonderful people, places, products and programs in the greater Marion community. To read more positive stories from Marion, or to share some of your own, visit us at marionmade.org or on social media.

The Huber Machinery Museum at Marion County Fairgrounds takes visitors on a journey from the 1800s, when hay was cut by hand with a scythe, through more than 150 years of Marion history, change and innovation. Visitors see how a local inventor sparked the creation of tractors, steam shovels, threshers, and ultimately the space exploration robot that took NASA shuttles to the launch pad and then to the moon.

“Things have changed so much in agriculture, construction and industry. It’s important to preserve it and show future generations how it was born,” said volunteer Don Kiel, former chairman of the Huber Machinery Museum board.

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Joanna posed in front of her favorite fireplace for the cover of Magnolia Journal Winter 2019, when they announced the renovation of the cstle. The full room will be revealed on the show. https://corfulinastravel.com/joanna-posed-in-front-of-her-favorite-fireplace-for-the-cover-of-magnolia-journal-winter-2019-when-they-announced-the-renovation-of-the-cstle-the-full-room-will-be-revealed-on-the-show/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 10:04:44 +0000 https://corfulinastravel.com/joanna-posed-in-front-of-her-favorite-fireplace-for-the-cover-of-magnolia-journal-winter-2019-when-they-announced-the-renovation-of-the-cstle-the-full-room-will-be-revealed-on-the-show/ “Are you ready to see your fixer upper?” asked the enthusiastic tour guide, channeling Chip and Joanna Gaines and their famous TV ‘big reveal’ line Upper fixator. This time, it wasn’t the homeowners waiting outside for a first glimpse of their home’s renovation; it was a small group of tourists gathered on the porch, ready […]]]>

“Are you ready to see your fixer upper?” asked the enthusiastic tour guide, channeling Chip and Joanna Gaines and their famous TV ‘big reveal’ line Upper fixator. This time, it wasn’t the homeowners waiting outside for a first glimpse of their home’s renovation; it was a small group of tourists gathered on the porch, ready to enter the Gaines’ most ambitious renovation project to date – a century-old castle in Waco.

For the first time ever, Texas’ home improvement king and queen opened the doors and let the public into one of their famous home repairers before it was featured on their Magnolia Network show.

Known as the historic Cottonland Castle, the three-story, 6,700-square-foot residence was begun in 1890 and completed in 1913. The Gaineses purchased the dilapidated structure in 2019 and designed and executed a regal turnaround that will be featured on an eight-episode special called Fixer Upper: Welcome Home – The Castlefrom October 14.

They plan to sell it in the fall. But before a house sale comes an open house, and for just three months – until October 29 – the chateau is open six days a week for guided tours.

Hour-long expeditions into the castle take visitors to every room, nook and cranny – from the turret to bathroom. Knowledgeable guides dispense history, pass on design information, and reveal behind-the-scenes stories of Chip and Jo that may or may not be on TV.

For Upper fixator fans, Magnolia maniacs and Gaines gang, it’s worth riding I-35 to Waco to experience the castle’s real-life transformation before it hits the small screen. A visit offers very rare chance to walk through the door (in this case, a 10-foot-tall, 400-pound solid oak door) into the world of a Chip-and-Jo reno.

Without giving too much away, here are seven fun surprises you’ll find behind the castle walls.

1. History meets intimacy. A castle-museum, this is not the case.

“Chip and Joanna’s vision was that they really wanted to honor it with historic pieces, but also make it more convenient for the modern family who will be living here in the future,” tour guide Megan Shuler said at the start of the tour. visit.

While many of the original features – including seven fireplaces – have been restored, the castle has been laid out as a home for the future, not a sanctuary for the past. Unique and collectible antiques (such as the royal dining table from Round Top, Texas) mingle with pieces from the Gaines’ own Magnolia Home collection. A 17-page “Castle Sourcebook” lists design elements and products and where to buy them. And in the ultimate modern twist – a branded tie – an upcoming “Colors of the Castle” paint collection will be available through Magnolia this fall.

2. Sweet nods to the castle’s past. A poem written by Alfred Abeel, the owner who completed the building in 1913, is displayed on the lobby wall. He talks about making the castle “‘home sweet home’ all seasons of the year.”

In the center of the dining room fireplace mantle is Abeel’s family crest, along with the phrase (in Latin) “God’s providence saves me”. Next, the height of children is recorded from the 1930s to the early 2000s, the last time a family lived here.

3. A cozy corner in the turret. The original design was modeled after a small castle on the Rhine in Germany, and there is a turret. A space historically used (in the “real” castles) for military defense has, here, been transformed into one of the most comfortable corners of the house. Tucked into a corner next to the spiral staircase, two comfortable chairs sit under an antique light fixture from Austria. It’s the perfect place to curl up with a book from the upstairs library.

4. Pieces with storylines. “One of the challenges Chip and Joanna faced when they bought the castle was that there really wasn’t anyone they were designing it for,” Shuler explained. “So they would create scenarios for each room to help tell their story.”

Two of the four bedrooms, for example, are the “boy’s bedroom” and the “girl’s bedroom”. The plots are that the future owner’s son would come home from college and stay in his childhood room, and the future owner’s granddaughters would stay in the room while hanging out at the grandparents.

The boy’s bedroom contains more masculine furnishings and decor, including a watercolor portrait of Roy Lane, the famous architect who helped complete the castle. The girl’s bedroom is painted “Rose Pink”, a color named after Joanna’s grandmother.

5. Bodacious bathrooms. There are three and a half “throne rooms” in the castle, and these are some of the most beautiful spaces, mixing metals, woods and tiles; even the original radiators look like works of art. One of the most spectacular rooms in the house, in fact, is a large, gleaming bathroom — which (tease!) will be fully revealed on the show.

6. Party in the basement. “Gathering spaces” are a feature of Chip and Jo’s homes, and in the castle, they take place in the dungeon – er, the basement. A “card room” for poker games or family game nights is located next to the family room, which houses the castle’s only television. The guest bedroom is also in the basement, as well as a laundry room and an old wine cellar now left “empty” so that the new owners can reinvent it.

7. Behind-the-scenes stories and treats. Upper fixator enthusiasts will devour the charming and quirky snippets about the Gaines shared throughout the tour. There are a few design elements and furniture originally intended for their own home, including an item banished to the castle by their daughters. There’s a funny story about what Chip did when they found bones – yes, bones – in the basement. And, the first selfie spot for Upper fixator fans is a large mirror that, according to tour guides, Joanna used to touch up her makeup while filming the show.

Tickets for the castle tour, $50, are available on the website, with 20% of proceeds going to the non-profit organization The Cove. (Note that the house does not have an elevator and requires guests’ ability to access three flights of stairs.)

Tips for a Magnolia Pilgrimage to Waco:
Shop: No castle getaway would be complete without a stop at the Magnolia Silos complex. A new 8:15 a.m. tour, offered Monday through Saturday, takes visitors behind the scenes and onto the rooftop before the crowds (and the heat) arrive. Hint: August is a “slower” month at the silos, and Tuesday through Thursday is less crowded. Tour tickets are $25 and come with a free coffee from Magnolia Press.

To eat: Chip and Joanna’s Magnolia Table cafe stays busy all day, every day. If you don’t have time to wait for a table, visit the take-out market next door. Grab takeaways like pimiento cheese and crackers, butter vol, banana pudding, and chicken salad sandwiches, and enjoy them on a table outside (if it’s not too hot).

Stay: Availability at all four Magnolia vacation rentals can be hard to come by, but watch the website for nights to open. Make it a girls’ getaway with a stay at the grand Hillcrest Estate (which sleeps 12), or go solo and book the darling Hillcrest Cottage, the Gaines’ newest and smallest accommodation, which opened in fall 2021. An upcoming Magnolia boutique hotel in the historic Grand Karem Sanctuary building downtown is slated to open in 2024.

Photo courtesy of Magnolia

Joanna posed in front of her favorite fireplace for the cover of Magnolia Journal Winter 2019, when they announced the renovation of the cstle. The full room will be revealed on the show.

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A walk on the road to independence https://corfulinastravel.com/a-walk-on-the-road-to-independence/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 17:17:58 +0000 https://corfulinastravel.com/a-walk-on-the-road-to-independence/ The Newport Historical Society’s “Road to Independence” tour, which takes participants on a journey through the city’s role in the struggle for American independence, begins at the organization’s museum in Brick Marketplace and ends at Vernon House on Clarke Street. Living in northeastern Pennsylvania, Anthony and Sara Markowski are no strangers to Quaker culture and […]]]>

The Newport Historical Society’s “Road to Independence” tour, which takes participants on a journey through the city’s role in the struggle for American independence, begins at the organization’s museum in Brick Marketplace and ends at Vernon House on Clarke Street.

Living in northeastern Pennsylvania, Anthony and Sara Markowski are no strangers to Quaker culture and history. But what the couple didn’t know was how the religion had become heavily affiliated with their home state.

The answer came during a Newport Historical Society summer walking tour that took attendees around the city’s Revolution-era architecture and landmarks.

“A lot of Quakers left town because everyone was mad at them before the Revolution,” said tour guide David Formanek. “The Patriots were mad at them because they weren’t going to fight, the Loyalists were mad at them because they weren’t going to fight.”

The “Road to Independence” tour brought together a dozen participants, many of them families or couples visiting the city, tracing the city’s path to revolution since its founding by English settlers in 1639. It started at the foot of Washington Square and included Ellery Park (where Formanek performed a theatrical account of the burning of HMS Gaspé), Captain William Read House, William Ellery House, Coddington Cemetery, Old Colony House and finally Vernon House. Along the way, relevant Newport landmarks and pre-auto streets served as a visual companion to the storytelling.

Tour participants enjoy local architecture and significant landmarks of the American Revolution, including the Newport Colony House (where city citizens celebrated the repeal of the Stamp Act in 1766).

Tour participants enjoy local architecture and significant landmarks of the American Revolution, including the Newport Colony House (where city citizens celebrated the repeal of the Stamp Act in 1766).

With the combination of historic architecture and Formanek’s narrative, it was easy to be transported back in time to around three or four centuries and imagine Newport as it was then – a bustling seaside colony of lucrative trade. , a fledgling rebellion and a staple of the American War for Home Rule.

In addition to the local timeline from early colonial upheaval to revolution against the British, tour participants also discovered Newport’s first Liberty Tree, a large button tree that once stood on the corner of Thames and Farewell streets. The land was owned by Captain William Read and ceded to William Ellery and the Sons of Liberty in support of the rebel group’s protest against the Stamp Act in 1766.

“One of the first acts of British occupation in 1776 was to pull it down because it was such a symbol,” Formanek said.

The original tree was replaced in 1897 by a European beech.

At the Vernon House, Formanek explained that General Washington and the Comte de Rochambeau once met to plan the 1781 siege of Yorktown, Virginia; the decisive battle between Franco-American forces and General Cornwallis’ overwhelmed British army that effectively ended the Revolutionary War.

The march of a sizable portion of the Continental Army to Yorktown, which was joined by French forces under Rochambeau, about 7,000 men in total, began at Newport.

But not everyone at the time was ready to take the path of battle.

The Quakers, or the Religious Society of Friends, the official name of the Christian movement, formed in the 1640s when religious dissenter George Fox began preaching the concept of “inner light” throughout England. the 18th century. The Conscientious Objector Act was passed in 1673, a provision that allowed anyone to refrain from fighting in a war for religious purposes. Despite the status of religion, Quakers were persecuted and some were even executed for their beliefs. A final straw for the exile of Rhode Island Quakers was perhaps the state’s passage of the Test Act in 1776, which required citizens to take an oath of loyalty to the United States.

“Quakers don’t take oaths,” Formanek said.

Many Quakers ended up in Pennsylvania because of the state’s commitment to religious freedom. There the Quakers flourished, establishing their own community, industry and way of life, which remains a tourist attraction to the present day.

When the tour arrived at the Great Friends Meeting House, a testament to the Quakers’ presence in Newport two centuries ago, attendees admired the sprawling lawn and prominent structure as Formanek explained the Quaker’s expertise in the work of the wood and furniture construction. Brown University sold a piece of furniture made by Quaker for $12 million in the 1980s, he said.

“I actually never realized how many Quakers were in Newport,” Sara Markowski said. “We hear a lot about the Quakers in Pennsylvania, obviously. We’ll go to Bethlehem, we’ll do Quaker tours near my house. But when we heard about woodworking here, I thought, “Wow,” because I didn’t know it was a Rhode Island thing.

“Understanding how Rhode Island was based on religious freedom and the role of Quakers in that area begins to understand why Quakers came to Pennsylvania,” Markowski said.

Walking tours are offered daily and include other themes, such as Colonial Newport, ‘Golden to the Gilded Age’, ‘Rogues and Scoundrels’, the Stamp Act, British occupation of the city, ‘Rum and Revolution’ and “18th Century Women in Newport. For more on walking tours, visit newporthistory.org.

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Japan set to welcome unrestricted tourism by October – The Diplomat https://corfulinastravel.com/japan-set-to-welcome-unrestricted-tourism-by-october-the-diplomat/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 23:55:21 +0000 https://corfulinastravel.com/japan-set-to-welcome-unrestricted-tourism-by-october-the-diplomat/ Tokyo Report | Company | East Asia Japan’s struggling tourism sector is seeing a light at the end of the tunnel as “self-guided” tours give way to full trips. Advertising After many false starts, Japan is set to fully reopen its borders to tourism next month after more than two years of strict COVID-19 border […]]]>

Tokyo Report | Company | East Asia

Japan’s struggling tourism sector is seeing a light at the end of the tunnel as “self-guided” tours give way to full trips.

After many false starts, Japan is set to fully reopen its borders to tourism next month after more than two years of strict COVID-19 border restrictions. According to local media, the daily entry cap for new arrivals, which was raised to 50,000 earlier this month, will be scrapped to make way for the pre-pandemic tourist visa waiver system initially available in 68 countries.

Under the current border restrictions related to COVID-19, foreign tourists must obtain a short-term visa and prepare their flights, itinerary, accommodation and car rental in advance through a travel agency. recognized trip. The Japanese government has scrapped mandatory pre-flight COVID-19 testing as long as visitors are triple vaccinated. It also removed the requirement for tourists to enter through a carefully monitored package tour with a licensed Japanese tour guide.

While the current situation is an improvement in terms of allowing independent travel, the continued restrictions on free and spontaneous travel have been criticized by experts as ineffective in helping the sluggish tourism sector recover to pre-war levels. pandemic. It may also deter tourists from choosing Japan as a travel destination, perhaps opting for Europe, which is currently embracing tourism.

In recent months, border restrictions have been eased with unprecedented speed. The daily entry cap for new arrivals was raised from 5,000 to 20,000 in June, then more than doubled to 50,000 on 7 September. countries and are continuously easing restrictions while monitoring COVID-19 infections. In a press conference, Kishida said, “Our fight against the virus is not easy but we must not be afraid to consider the Omicron variant.” He also explained that he wanted tourists to “take advantage of the weak Japanese yen”.

The Japanese government has come under immense pressure from the international community to remove barriers to travel. It is the only G-7 country that still imposes restrictions on arrivals. However, the government has been reluctant to fully reveal plans to open the border to international tourists. While authorities had confirmed their intention to resume pre-pandemic travel this year, they were reluctant to give a timetable. Kishida said border restrictions will continue to be eased “as soon as possible”, leaving local businesses in tourist hotspots on edge and uncertain about whether to prepare for a surge in customers this fall. . The lack of details also makes it difficult for tourists to determine whether to travel now or come later when restrictions are fully lifted.

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Despite the gradual easing of border restrictions, there has been no rebound in the number of tourists traveling to Japan. In June, fewer than 300 foreign tourists entered Japan under the controversial package tour requirement. The following month, less than 8,000 tourists entered Japan.

A local business that rents out kimonos to tourists in the usually bustling tourist hotspot of Asakusa said sales fell by half from 2019. Although it welcomed international visitors two months after the borders opened to tourists, no reservations have been made for the rest. of the year. Experts warn there will be no recovery in tourism unless tourism fully reopens.

Despite suffering a record seventh wave of COVID-19 infections this summer, Japan has shifted its focus to economic recovery and “living with COVID-19”. The central government is focusing on preventing coronavirus-related deaths rather than spreading infections. As part of the change, they plan to lift mandatory reporting of every COVID-19 infection in hospitals to ease administrative burdens on frontline physicians and allow them to spend more time with patients.

Currently, doctors are legally required to report all positive COVID-19 tests to public health centers. Until last year, this was a handwritten process that had to be faxed, but it has since been replaced by an online process. The central government is now considering limiting mandatory reporting to only severe cases and people in high-risk categories who test positive. Kishida said “the priority will be to protect the most vulnerable in society, such as the elderly.”

The government is also considering giving each municipality the option to stop reporting all cases of COVID-19. The policy change will put the country in uncharted waters as the national infection tally will no longer be representative of the number of people officially testing positive for COVID-19. The government aims to change public perceptions of the coronavirus and is on track to downgrade COVID-19 to a level similar to seasonal flu.

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Council approves tourism rules and regulations with amendments https://corfulinastravel.com/council-approves-tourism-rules-and-regulations-with-amendments/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 09:18:14 +0000 https://corfulinastravel.com/council-approves-tourism-rules-and-regulations-with-amendments/ Dechen Dolkar In a move hailed by stakeholders, the Tourism Board of Bhutan (TCB) approved proposed changes to the Draft Tourism Rules and Regulations 2022 by service providers on September 8. Council members agreed to insert a provision stating that tourists can pay the Sustainable Development Fee (SDF) and apply for a visa directly or […]]]>

Dechen Dolkar

In a move hailed by stakeholders, the Tourism Board of Bhutan (TCB) approved proposed changes to the Draft Tourism Rules and Regulations 2022 by service providers on September 8.

Council members agreed to insert a provision stating that tourists can pay the Sustainable Development Fee (SDF) and apply for a visa directly or through tour operators.

The board decided that the TCB secretariat will follow up on the clearance of SDF’s transfer through the tour operator‘s foreign currency account at the Department of Immigration. The draft rule states that the department will collect the SDF.

The council also approved the one-night SDF waiver for tourists staying in border towns of Bhutan without traveling beyond the designated points.

It has also been decided that TCB will follow up with the Ministry of Finance to offer discounts in accordance with Tourism Rules and Regulations 2017 for tours confirmed by June 20 this year.

Alternatively, the Cabinet will issue an Executive Order authorizing discounts for confirmed visits no later than June 20. Monument fees will also not apply to visits confirmed on or before June 20.

The board has also accepted that online portals can be any portal or booking system integrated with company websites, but must be identified or registered with TCB.

It has been decided that a tourist or tour operator will organize at least one guide for every 10 tourists in a group or a maximum of 15 tourists if accompanied by a guide or a main tour leader.

The council also approved that there will be no age limit for foreign vehicles as long as the Road Safety and Transport Authority (RSTA) certifies their technical inspection.

The Council also removed the age requirement for tourist vehicles and their drivers. That’s left to RSTA rules.

A tourist on a motorbike tour using a foreign or Bhutanese registered motorbike must have a maximum of 10 people per party to meet the requirement of a road captain and an emergency vehicle for the party. Larger groups would be permitted, but should be split as required by the route captain and rescue vehicle.

The council decided to assign one trekking guide for every seven tourists or a maximum of 12 tourists in one case accompanied by a senior tourist guide or an attendant.

The council said commercial bonding was introduced to professionalise the industry and as part of the required investment in addition to protecting both customers and service providers. This is also a common practice in many countries.

The board has decided that TCB will work on how to introduce business obligations, such as applying for new licenses and, after a few years, make it compulsory for all.

The board approved that guides would now be categorized into three tiers instead of four.

TCB will review the applicability of the homestay clause based on ground realities which should be rural or outside of municipal boundaries.

It was also decided that the practicality of penalties and fines will be reviewed.

Kuensel learned that draft rules and regulations that have been approved by the board will be submitted to cabinet for final approval.

However, it was mentioned that the draft rules and regulations are not set in stone and can be modified and adapted depending on the situation and progress.

Meanwhile, officials from the TCB secretariat could not be reached for comment.

Members of the board are Foreign Minister Tandi Dorji as Chairman, Secretary of Home Affairs, Director General of TCB Secretariat, Chairmen of ABTO, HRAB and GAB, Sarpang dzongdags and Trashiyangtse, and Dr. Karma Tshering, the founder of the Bhutan Sustainable Tourism Society.

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The “walking” statues of Easter Island https://corfulinastravel.com/the-walking-statues-of-easter-island/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 18:06:06 +0000 https://corfulinastravel.com/the-walking-statues-of-easter-island/ According to Lipo, the reason the Rapanui chose to walk over the statues rather than dragging them or rolling them over logs came down to practicalities. The weight of the carvings would have crushed the logs, while dragging such enormous moai would have required enormous labor. On a remote, arid island with few resources, stepping […]]]>

According to Lipo, the reason the Rapanui chose to walk over the statues rather than dragging them or rolling them over logs came down to practicalities. The weight of the carvings would have crushed the logs, while dragging such enormous moai would have required enormous labor. On a remote, arid island with few resources, stepping on the statues would have been an effective method. “You see the engineering that made it possible to make and move the moai cheaply. The Rapanui people did it within the confines of the island, basically through cooperation and ingenuity,” he said.

My walk from Rano Raraku crater to Ahu Tongariki was only 800m away, but I wasn’t trying to guide an 88 ton moai with a few ropes. Other statues I visited stood up to 18km from the quarry, making my bike ride a breeze compared to the feats of ancient Rapanui civilizations.

Creating walking statues would have been a process of trial and error. About 400 statues remain in and around the Rano Raraku quarry in various stages of completion, indicating that stone carvers used the valley as an artistic laboratory to experiment with different prototypes before finding one that could be moved. effectively, Lipo said. “It really documents the history of craftsmanship, experiments, attempts and failures,” he added.

Once a statue was ready, it was led out of the valley and guided to its ahu. The ancient roads leading to Rano Raraku were concave, which aided and supported the lateral swinging movements of the moai. However, not all moai reached their ahus – some lost their balance along the way and fell off the roads. Visitors to the quarry will see the ruins of dozens of abandoned statues littering the outer slopes and roadsides; it is the best place on the island to get an idea of ​​the immense number of moai created. Lipo’s study found that these fallen moai have breaks consistent with falls from an upright standing position, supporting the theory that they were walking.

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Bengoh Range: Sarawak’s Jurassic World Attracts Tourists https://corfulinastravel.com/bengoh-range-sarawaks-jurassic-world-attracts-tourists/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 01:08:40 +0000 https://corfulinastravel.com/bengoh-range-sarawaks-jurassic-world-attracts-tourists/ PADAWAN (Sarawak) (September 6): An hour’s drive from Kuching City is Bengoh Range, Sarawak’s Jurassic World. With its pristine natural beauty and majestic waterfalls, this treasure offers tourists a quick getaway for a breath of fresh air away from the hustle and bustle of city life. Surrounded by untouched nature, tourists can enjoy recreational activities […]]]>

PADAWAN (Sarawak) (September 6): An hour’s drive from Kuching City is Bengoh Range, Sarawak’s Jurassic World.

With its pristine natural beauty and majestic waterfalls, this treasure offers tourists a quick getaway for a breath of fresh air away from the hustle and bustle of city life.

Surrounded by untouched nature, tourists can enjoy recreational activities such as hiking and experience a village lifestyle while visiting this place, a wonderful hidden gem of Sarawak, also known as the land of hornbills .

Local guide Joekasi Kosok, 37, who is an indigenous Bidayuh from a nearby village, said that several residents who were transferred to the Bengoh Resettlement Program (BRS), namely Kampung Rejoi, Semban, Taba Sait and Pain Bojong, relied on the Bengoh Dam. for tourism activities such as the provision of boat service packages.

“From the starting point at Bengoh Dam Pier, visitors will embark on a 20-minute boat ride before entering the village area for their hiking expedition and experience the grandeur of the waterfalls while immersing themselves in the exquisite natural landscape,” he told Bernama.

“They can also opt for an overnight stay at Kampung Sting, located at the top of Bukit Butah here and the price for a day trip starts from RM50 per person,” he said, adding that the price includes guide and boat service. as well as village entrance fees.

DISCONNECT TO CONNECT

The Bengoh Range, with its beautiful natural environment and rich biodiversity, helps visitors step into the jungle by disconnecting from the online world to reconnect with nature.

The writer experienced a digital detox while visiting the location as no phone signal was found. As such, don’t expect any notifications or calls here.

“These days young people cannot ‘survive’ if there is no internet or Wi-Fi. They cannot live without it so they leave the village. There aren’t many people my age left, and most of the villagers who stay and run the business are old people,” he said.

According to Joekasi, seasonal flooding aggravated by the construction of the Bengoh dam in 2007 may have forced some residents of several Bidayuh villages here to leave the area and resettle in BRS.

He said those who chose not to move decided to actively promote the area as a tourist spot through social media after receiving positive feedback from tourists who visited the place.

Apart from fertile land, he said villagers can now earn a side income as more and more people know about the place through social media, with Bengoh Dam on their travel list when visiting Kuching. .

Also known as Joe among friends and family, the father-of-four who also runs a boat rental and homestay service said villagers used bamboo poles to build walking paths hiking and bridges when crossing rivers.

“During your trek, you can see bamboo growing naturally and abundantly here, so the villagers use it as a path and a bridge and replace them once or twice a year.

“The bamboo poles are tied with durable PVC (polyvinyl chloride) plastic straps and the poles will be changed once or twice a year, if necessary,” he said, adding that locals would clean the trail as needed. weekend.

BREATHTAKING WATERFALLS

While hiking along the trail, you will be mesmerized by some of the breathtaking waterfalls in the Bengoh Range such as Rideau Waterfall, Koring Waterfall, Pe’an Waterfall, along with the Farthest Susung. The 1.5 km trail is one hour from the village entrance.

Here the writer found a huge and sturdy hanging branch to sit on and capture images with the view of the alluring Susung Waterfall in the background.

“Visitors are not allowed to swim in Susung Waterfall for safety reasons as the water is very deep. However, they can enjoy the cool waters of Rideau Waterfall,” Joekasi said.

The Curtain and Susung waterfalls have recently sparked local interest due to their unique resemblance to the jungles of the popular film Jurassic World.

Tourists who stop for a visit to Kampung Sting located on Bukit Butah (Bengoh Range), which also offers homestay facilities, can enjoy the unparalleled picturesque view of Bengoh Dam from the top of the hill under the azure sky.

“Villagers grow various types of fruits like guava, durian, rambutan and pineapple. Tourists can get them for free, but usually the fruit season will be in November and December,” Joekasi said, noting that there are around 14 houses in Kampung Sting.

At Kampung Sting, a homestay owner, Tikom Duyau warmly welcomed visitors in a local Bidayuh language, “Seramat Manug (Welcome)”.

The 66-year-old who has run the business for more than 10 years said visitors who choose to stay overnight at his home can bring their own food to cook as it is equipped with a stove, cooking utensils kitchen, in addition to basic necessities such as mattresses. and pillows.

POTENTIAL TOURIST ATTRACTION

With Bengoh Range’s growing popularity among visitors outside Kuching, Tikom said local residents are hoping for collaborations with the state government and Tourism Malaysia to promote Bengoh as a tourist destination through government platforms.

Meanwhile, Joekasi said reservations are needed to enter the Bengoh Dam as visitor numbers can reach up to 300 visitors per day on weekends and 20-40 visitors per day on weekdays.

“When I promote the place on Facebook, I always advise potential tourists planning to go on the weekend to contact for reservations two weeks in advance as we only have 10 boats operating in this dam and nearly 30 inhabitants who manage this place of leisure.

“All leisure activities here are entirely run by locals, as well as maintenance. We appreciate if the government is ready to assist and provide assistance to locals to maintain and boost the tourism sector here,” he said.

Bengoh Dam is capable of storing 114 million cubic meters of water with a catchment area of ​​127 square kilometers intended under a water supply project for the needs of the people of Kuching city and districts. surrounding.

The project worth over RM300 million started in 2007 and was fully completed in January 2017.

“Bengoh Dam sangon poson (Bengoh Dam is very beautiful). Harap bidapod lagik (Hope to see you again),” Joekasi said after sending the writer back to Bengoh Dam Pier.

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The beginning of a monumental change? https://corfulinastravel.com/the-beginning-of-a-monumental-change/ Sat, 03 Sep 2022 09:00:32 +0000 https://corfulinastravel.com/the-beginning-of-a-monumental-change/ For more than three decades, Robert Kaplan has challenged readers with his distinctive blend of travel writing, journalism and foreign affairs analysis. His most recent book, Adriatic, returns to South-Eastern Europe, a corner of the world that has nourished his thoughts since the beginning of his career. Kaplan revels in the historical and cultural mess […]]]>

For more than three decades, Robert Kaplan has challenged readers with his distinctive blend of travel writing, journalism and foreign affairs analysis. His most recent book, Adriatic, returns to South-Eastern Europe, a corner of the world that has nourished his thoughts since the beginning of his career. Kaplan revels in the historical and cultural mess of this regional palimpsest, with its layers of Greek, Roman, North African, Byzantine, Ottoman, Jewish, Islamic, Slavic and even Mongol influence. Traveling from Italian Rimini, on the northwest coast of the Adriatic, then around the northern shore of the sea through Italy and Slovenia, and finally south through Croatia, Montenegro and Albania, until it ends on the island of Corfu, Kaplan sifts through these various civilizational layers. and flushes out their persistence in the present.

Kaplan’s instincts as a travel writer are superb. He understands the importance of history and dwells on the particularity of each stage of his itinerary. He is a good listener, recording many conversations with local politicians and scholars, allowing their different perspectives to come to the fore. He appeals to art, architecture and especially literature for the understanding they offer of a people and its politics. He reads a lot, collecting books at each stop along the way and letting one text lead him by chance to another. He knows that we only manage to understand ourselves by being pulled out of ourselves, and that the great virtue of travel is precisely to do this.

Adriatic is nonetheless a frustrating book at times, in part because Kaplan is surprisingly reticent about the argument he wishes to make, which the patient reader must let gradually emerge from his rich portraits of individual towns. The book is an exercise in induction, with conclusions slowly emerging through the accumulation of detail. Only in the last 10 pages of the book does Kaplan give a clear and concise statement of the argument he has constructed, which I would summarize in terms of four interrelated assertions.

First, Europe is not a homogeneous cultural unit, but rather the product of many cultural influences, from north and south, east and west; from Europe, North Africa, the Middle East and Asia; Western Christianity, Eastern Orthodoxy and Islam; and various imperial formations, including the Roman, Byzantine, Ottoman, and Habsburg empires, as well as, nowadays, the European Union. Efforts to separate these influences from each other, draw sharp lines between them, and label only certain elements as “European” are misleading.

Secondly, this intermingling of civilizations is not only a thing of the past, but will also shape the future of Europe, especially as demographic pressures produce continued migration and resurrect ancient ties across the Mediterranean and even beyond (Kaplan repeatedly suggests, without elaborating, that China, through its Belt and Road Initiative, is now becoming a key player in the Mediterranean).

Third, Europe is therefore at the start of an era of significant change, in which the future may look much more like the distant past than the recent past. In particular, political structures are changing. Historically, complex civilizational mixtures have most often existed peacefully under the rule of an empire. The modern state, which has often strived to be a mono-ethnic nation-state, is ill-suited to govern such a cultural mix; it will be increasingly strained, to be replaced either by empires like the EU (which is an empire, says Kaplan, whether she admits it is or not), or by vibrant regional metropolises with identities similar to those of independent city-states.

Finally, the outbursts of nationalist populism that have emerged across the West are not a harbinger of the future but rather the last gasp of a dying past, as national histories and cultures face a continued erosion in the face of international migration, trade and tourism. Kaplan uses various terms to describe the world that emerges instead. On at least one occasion he describes it as neo-medieval, but more often than not it is “postmodern” or, most often, “primo-modern”. Indeed, these two terms seem to mean much the same thing to Kaplan: a world of overlapping and intersecting identities, where local, national, regional and global identities coexist and in which sober attention to interests undermines passionate identity crusades. (The fact that modern Europe has also been the scene of fierce religious wars is not mentioned.) Europe’s own cosmopolitan and universalist values ​​push it in this direction, for by their very nature they must suitable for various peoples and cultures.

One way to understand this collection of theses is as a retort to Samuel Huntington’s famous prediction of the “clash of civilizations” that the post-Cold War era would be defined by conflicts between global civilizations (Western, Islamic, Sinic , Hindu, etc.). Kaplan and Huntington share some ground. The civilizations of the latter were based on primordial factors such as religion, ethnicity and language. Consequently, they have the kind of long-term perseverance that Kaplan discovers on his travels. Huntingtonian civilizations are also larger than the nation and thus reflect a view of international relations that is not narrowly state-centric. Nevertheless, Huntington’s description of the world implies that the boundaries between civilizations are relatively clear and easy to draw. Without explicitly targeting Huntington, Kaplan argues forcefully that this is an oversimplification.

Nevertheless, Kaplan’s broader claims are not entirely convincing. I feel the tug of his rich and diverse universe of the Adriatic, which at its best has been a tolerant mix of religions, languages ​​and national traditions that constantly rub shoulders. Modern American conservatism, with its Burkean influence, has been anti-ideological, anti-rationalist, and values ​​tradition as a source of collective wisdom. It is therefore engaged in a kind of particularism and, consequently, of pluralism. Kaplan is an expert at bewitching this particularistic pluralism, and it would not be misleading to characterize his book’s appeal as akin to cultural enchantment.

But he misinterprets the direction of the contemporary world. A small clue to this is his repeated description of it as “postmodern”, at a time when postmodernism has become almost completely outmoded, is no longer a subject of interest outside of a few narrow strands of continental philosophy and literary theory. The elements of postmodernism that were valuable – particularly its recognition that people always inhabit specific times and places and therefore operate from particular and limited perspectives – were never really at odds with modernity, nor particularly new. In fact, our somewhat reflexive tendency to label things “postmodern” is among the factors that prevent us from seeing the real shape of our own world.

In our world, the state, despite repeated predictions that it was on the decline, is not weak; on the contrary, it remained strong and resilient. International politics does not resemble the early modern world, but rather the decades before World War I, driven by balance-of-power maneuvers between the great powers. The most powerful ideology in the world today is exactly what it has been since 1848, perhaps since the French Revolution: nationalism. The international critical divide is not civilizational; it is the struggle, best described by Robert Kagan, between free countries and autocracies. We are not in a postmodern world, and certainly not in a modern world. Instead, we’re back in the 19th century.

Time will tell if my 19th century parallels or Kaplan’s early modern parallels prove more illuminating. In the meantime, he’s a wonderful tour guide, and anyone trying to peer into the crystal ball hopes that Adriatic is not the last of his globe-trotting reports. Reading his book makes you want to read it again while retracing the stages of his journey. His palpable thirst for knowledge of human cultures and his tireless effort to wring new perspectives from a life of travel and reading are exemplary. I suspect, however, that the world unfolding before us will not be “the start of a monumental change” he predicts for Europe, but rather surprisingly familiar.

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Altruistic local artist in there only for the good https://corfulinastravel.com/altruistic-local-artist-in-there-only-for-the-good/ Wed, 31 Aug 2022 23:34:39 +0000 https://corfulinastravel.com/altruistic-local-artist-in-there-only-for-the-good/ by Andrew Alonzo | aalonzo@clarremont-courier.com As we head towards Alan Jack’s house, we can’t help but notice a large, howling metallic coyote with a big red nose laying on the lawn. It’s an eye-catching piece of art, especially at night when the nearby light casts a fierce silhouette over the house. The piece has been […]]]>

by Andrew Alonzo | aalonzo@clarremont-courier.com

As we head towards Alan Jack’s house, we can’t help but notice a large, howling metallic coyote with a big red nose laying on the lawn. It’s an eye-catching piece of art, especially at night when the nearby light casts a fierce silhouette over the house.

The piece has been howling proudly in front of the Occidental Drive home since 2008.

The coyote has sentimental value to Jack as it is the first of many original works he began creating after he began metal carving in 2008.

He’s kind of a local celebrity. When asked “Tell me about yourself,” he opened a PowerPoint presentation prepared for the Rotary Club Claremont that detailed his, pardon the pun, jack-of-all-trades leanings.

He worked in sales for many years at GE Medical Systems, selling vascular imaging systems and equipment to hospitals. Locally, he lent his voice to the Claremont Presbyterian Choir for 36 years and was a volunteer Claremont police officer for a time before retiring in 2006.

One thing each of his jobs had in common was that Jack always found himself helping people, a trait he inherited from his mother, Joann. She would handcraft little chocolate Easter eggs and, along with young Jack, deliver them around the neighborhood out of sheer kindness. She asked for no reward or recognition.

“She taught me to be a giver, not a taker,” Jack said. “She never said those words. I learned by doing.”

In 2006, Jack and his wife Beverly took a spontaneous trip to Los Olivos, California, near Solvang. There they came across a small garden shop with metal garden work all around. This planted an idea that she would later whisper to Jack.

Worried about his ADHD and how he might pass the time during his retirement, she suggested Jack take up metal art to avoid boredom. He did so and thus began a new chapter of service for him.

He picked it up quickly and forged a bond with the craft. “I’ve always been good with my hands,” he says.

He honed his skills throughout 2008 and 2009, creating two little metal squirrels and a mother quail.

In 2010, we were talking about his charming metal works of art. He created and donated another squirrel to Claremont afterschool programs for a drawing and raffle. This was the first time Jack had donated a coin to raise money for a great cause. It wouldn’t be the last.

Soon he was getting calls from other nonprofits offering similar deals, and it only grew from there.

Jack’s finished pieces can fetch over $1,000. Whether they’re going to raise money for a non-profit organization or as gifts for friends, he seems perfectly content.

In 2013, Jack created his ninth piece, a kiwi bird for Analeise Ferguson, the couple’s tour guide during a 20-day trip to New Zealand. After making this piece, he realized that his hobby was turning into a charitable passion project that he couldn’t put out.

All of Jack’s 82 pieces of metal art to date have been created in his makeshift studio in Claremont – his two-car garage. About 17 coins went to benefit charities including the California Botanic Garden, CLASP, Habitat for Humanity and the Wounded Warrior Project.

Jack sources most of his materials from local businesses and since 2008 has used a Bosch JS260 portable saw to shape his metal creations. He cuts each from a piece of sheet metal and carves each wooden support by hand.

Between the first sketch and the final assembly, it takes him about six months to complete a piece. He makes between four and six a year.

He has a waiting list of future projects, but he stressed that he is not looking for commercial gain or recognition.

He tells organizations when they receive the gifts, “I know you’re going to show this to people at your charity and people will want to order two or three. I can not do that. I won’t because it now puts pressure on me to do a certain number per month and I’m not set up to do that.

Jack invites charities to contact him via email at alan.jack37@yahoo.com to request handcrafted artwork for an upcoming auction. He also works on personalized gifts for friends and family, but only on his terms.

And if Jack asks you about your favorite animal, that’s a strong indication that he’s considering giving you a piece of metal art, for free and from the goodness of his heart, just like mom used to.

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